BREAKING!!! President Trump Accuses OBAMA Of WIRE TAPPING Trump Towers Before The Election!

Saturday morning President Trump has come out with a series of tweets accusing former President Obama of wire tapping his offices at Trump Towers. President Trump has recently suggested that Obama and left over loyalists within the White House and other branches of government have been trying to undermine the peaceful transfer of power.

“Terrible! Just found out that Obama had my ‘wires tapped’ in Trump Tower just before the victory. Nothing found. This is McCarthyism!”

Trump wrote, in another he said: “Is it legal for a sitting President to be “wire tapping” a race for president prior to an election? Turned down by court earlier. A NEW LOW!”

But he didn’t stop there he went on to say: “I’d bet a good lawyer could make a great case out of the fact that President Obama was tapping my phones in October, just prior to Election!”

Then, there’s the Russian connection. For some time now, the Obama administration and others on the extreme far left have been pushing this idea that the Russians were influencing our elections. Recently, even accusing Trump administration officials and campaign workers of meeting with the Russians.

Most recently in the news is Attorney General Sessions, who testified in front of Congress that as a member of the Trump campaign he never met with Russian officials. However, we later found out he did have a meeting with the Russian Ambassador as part of his official role as a sitting US Senator.

In one of Trump’s tweets he suggests that the meeting that the left is now accusing AG Sessions of having was actually set up by the Obama administration. He wrote: “The first meeting Jeff Sessions had with the Russian Amb was set up by the Obama Administration under education program for 100 Ambs.”

President Trump then turns the tables on Obama and points out that Obama himself had met with the Russians 22 times. Let’s not forget that meeting with the Russian president, with the “hot mic” moment, where Obama tells the Russian President to let Vlad know that after his election he will have more flexibility.

For sometime now there’s been talk of the “Deep State,” or possibly even an Obama shadow government being set up. With the recent revelations that Valerie Jarrett will be operating the nerve center of this out of Obama’s Washington DC mansion, it’s beginning to look a lot more like a reality.

This story is developing with new information and tweets coming in. We will keep you updated.

READ MORE

Congratulations to Representative Cole Hefner!

Representative Cole Hefner (District 5) was seated on two committees:  Criminal Jurisprudence Committee and Pensions.  See below for a description of the committee work involved.

    Sec. 7.  CRIMINAL JURISPRUDENCE. The committee shall have
seven  members, with jurisdiction over all matters pertaining to:
             (1)  criminal law, prohibitions, standards, and
penalties;
             (2)  probation and parole;
             (3)  criminal procedure in the courts of Texas;
             (4)  revision or amendment of the Penal Code; and
             (5)  the following state agencies:  the Office of State
Prosecuting Attorney and the Texas State Council for Interstate
Adult Offender Supervision.

 

 Sec. 29.  PENSIONS. The committee shall have seven  members,
with jurisdiction over all matters pertaining to:
             (1)  benefits or participation in benefits of a public
retirement system and the financial obligations of a public
retirement system; and
             (2)  the following state agencies: the Texas Emergency
Services Retirement System, the Board of Trustees of the Teacher
Retirement System of Texas, the Board of Trustees of the Employees
Retirement System of Texas, the Board of Trustees of the Texas
County and District Retirement System, the Board of Trustees of the
Texas Municipal Retirement System, and the State Pension Review
Board.

Sen. Burton’s Press Conference on Civil Asset Forfeiture #txlege

 

Yesterday,  Senator Konni Burton and others came together for a quick press conference on her bill concerning Civil Asset Forfeiture.  SB 380 has bipartisan support.

Mansfield’s Police Chief Tracy Aaron needs to speak to our Sheriff Chief David Hazel.  There are many members of law enforcement that believe CAF needs reform, and do not view Burton’s and others actions as anti-law enforcement.

Watch the video HERE.

Governor Abbott tells Texas House ‘no Rainy Day’ fund

 

 

Recently members of the Texas House Leadership team have suggested that money should be taken from the Rainy Day Fund, our state savings account. I stand with Governor Abbott and say no way! It is time to cut government, not grow spending. The only reason to ever take money out of the Rainy Day Fund is to refund the ones who put it there, THE TAX PAYERS! 

Watch the video here

How did your Texas Representative vote on Transparency?

Check out LoneStarOnline.com’s recent article on the topic.  How did your Representative vote?

January 28, 2017

**This will be the final article in a series of articles dealing with the adoption of House rules.

Transparency was a common theme among 28 filed amendments to the House rules. Seven transparency amendments were filed and hotly debated, and in the end, only two of the seven were adopted.

The following amendments were either withdrawn or failed from lack of support by the House:

Rep. Tony Tinderholt (R) – Before a bill goes to the full house for a hearing, it must go to the calendar’s committee in order to be scheduled. However, members of the calendar’s committee can anonymously “tag” a bill. This is an informal process whereby one single member, without being identified or recorded, can stop a bill from moving any further, essentially killing the legislation. Rep. Tinderholt’s amendment would require the tagging member to be identified and recorded for public viewing. His amendment failed on a vote of 130-16, 2 Present, not voting.

Yeas — Allen; Alonzo; Alvarado; Anchia; Anderson, C.; Anderson R.;

Are ́valo; Ashby; Bailes; Bell; Bernal; Blanco; Bonnen, D.; Bonnen, G.; Burkett;

Burns; Burrows; Button; Canales; Capriglione; Clardy; Coleman; Collier; Cook;

Cortez; Cosper; Craddick; Cyrier; Dale; Darby; Davis, S.; Davis, Y.; Dean;

Deshotel; Dukes; Dutton; Elkins; Faircloth; Fallon; Farrar; Flynn; Frank; Frullo;

Geren; Gervin-Hawkins; Giddings; Goldman; Gonzales; Gonzalez; Gooden;

Guerra; Guillen; Gutierrez; Hernandez; Herrero; Hinojosa; Holland; Howard;

Huberty; Hunter; Isaac; Israel; Johnson, E.; Johnson, J.; Kacal; King, K.; King,

P.; King, T.; Klick; Koop; Lambert; Landgraf; Larson; Laubenberg; Longoria;

Lozano; Lucio; Metcalf; Meyer; Miller; Minjarez; Moody; Morrison; Mun ̃oz;

Murphy; Murr; Neave; Neva ́rez; Oliveira; Oliverson; Ortega; Paddie; Parker;

Paul; Perez; Phelan; Phillips; Pickett; Price; Raney; Raymond; Reynolds;

Roberts; Rodriguez, E.; Rodriguez, J.; Romero; Rose; Schubert; Sheffield; Shine;

Simmons; Smithee; Springer; Stephenson; Stucky; Thierry; Thompson, E.;

Thompson, S.; Turner; Uresti; VanDeaver; Villalba; Vo; Walle; White; Wilson;

Workman; Wray; Wu; Zerwas.

Nays — Biedermann; Cain; Hefner; Keough; Krause; Lang; Leach; Rinaldi;

Sanford; Schaefer; Schofield; Shaheen; Stickland; Swanson; Tinderholt; Zedler.

Rep. Jonathan Stickland (R) – When a bill goes to the House floor for a hearing, members can  file amendments to that bill, but the amendments must be related to the topic of the bill (germane). If the amendment is not germane, the rules provide a route for members to point out the flaw (point of order). However the House has the practice of looking at those amendments, deciding that they aren’t germane to the bill, and refusing to give them a hearing without a point of order being called and without a public ruling being given. Rep. Stickland’s amendment would have required the Speaker to let the amendment be heard and, if a point of order is called on the amendment, the Speaker must give a public ruling on the point of order. The amendment failed on a vote of 127-18.

 Yeas — Allen; Alonzo; Alvarado; Anchia; Anderson, C.; Anderson, R.;

Are ́valo; Ashby; Bailes; Bell; Bernal; Blanco; Bonnen, D.; Bonnen, G.; Burkett;

Burns; Burrows; Button; Canales; Capriglione; Clardy; Coleman; Collier; Cook;

Cortez; Cosper; Craddick; Dale; Darby; Davis, S.; Davis, Y.; Dean; Deshotel;

Dukes; Dutton; Elkins; Faircloth; Fallon; Farrar; Flynn; Frank; Frullo; Geren;

Gervin-Hawkins; Giddings; Goldman; Gonzales; Gonza ́lez; Gooden; Guerra;

Guillen; Gutierrez; Hernandez; Herrero; Hinojosa; Holland; Howard; Huberty;

Hunter; Isaac; Israel; Johnson, E.; Johnson, J.; Kacal; King, K.; King, P.; King,

T.; Koop; Kuempel; Lambert; Landgraf; Larson; Laubenberg; Longoria; Lozano;

Lucio; Metcalf; Meyer; Miller; Minjarez; Moody; Morrison; Mun ̃oz; Murphy;

Murr; Neave; Neva ́rez; Oliverson; Ortega; Paddie; Parker; Paul; Perez; Phelan;

Phillips; Pickett; Price; Raney; Raymond; Reynolds; Roberts; Romero; Rose;

Schubert; Sheffield; Shine; Simmons; Smithee; Springer; Stephenson; Stucky;

Thierry; Turner; Uresti; VanDeaver; Villalba; Vo; Walle; Workman; Wray; Wu;

Zedler; Zerwas.

Nays — Biedermann; Bohac; Cain; Hefner; Keough; Krause; Lang; Leach;

Rinaldi; Sanford; Schaefer; Schofield; Shaheen; Stickland; Swanson; Tinderholt;

White; Wilson.

Rep. Tony Tinderholt (R) – if a member of the committee opposes placing a bill on the Local & Consent calendar, the opposition and the opposing member must be recorded for public reference. The amendment failed on a vote of 121-21. 2 Present, not voting.

Yeas — Allen; Alonzo; Alvarado; Anchia; Anderson, C.; Anderson R.;

Are ́valo; Ashby; Bailes; Bernal; Blanco; Bonnen, D.; Bonnen, G.; Burkett;

Burns; Burrows; Button; Capriglione; Clardy; Coleman; Collier; Cook; Cortez;

Craddick; Cyrier; Dale; Darby; Davis, S.; Davis, Y.; Dean; Deshotel; Dukes;

Dutton; Elkins; Faircloth; Farrar; Flynn; Frank; Frullo; Geren; Gervin-Hawkins;

Giddings; Goldman; Gonzales; Gonza ́lez; Gooden; Guerra; Guillen; Gutierrez;

Hernandez; Herrero; Hinojosa; Howard; Huberty; Hunter; Isaac; Israel; Johnson,

E.; Johnson, J.; Kacal; King, K.; King, P.; King, T.; Klick; Koop; Lambert;

Landgraf; Larson; Laubenberg; Longoria; Lucio; Metcalf; Meyer; Miller;

Minjarez; Moody; Morrison; Mun ̃oz; Murphy; Murr; Neave; Neva ́rez; Oliveira;

Oliverson; Ortega; Paddie; Parker; Paul; Perez; Phelan; Phillips; Pickett; Price;

Raney; Raymond; Reynolds; Roberts; Rodriguez, E.; Rodriguez, J.; Romero;

Rose; Schubert; Sheffield; Shine; Simmons; Smithee; Springer; Stucky; Thierry;

Thompson, E.; Thompson, S.; Turner; Uresti; VanDeaver; Villalba; Vo; Walle;

Workman; Wray; Wu; Zerwas.

Nays — Bell; Biedermann; Cain; Fallon; Hefner; Keough; Krause; Lang;

Leach; Lozano; Rinaldi; Sanford; Schaefer; Schofield; Shaheen; Stickland;

Swanson; Tinderholt; White; Wilson; Zedler.

Rep. Matt Schaefer (R) – Currently, the appropriations committee does not have to provide any of its documents to fellow House members. Rep. Schaefer’s amendment would have made any and all appropriations committee documents available to any member who requests them. Although Rep. Schaefer withdrew his amendment, he got Rep. Darby, assumed-chair of the appropriations committee, on record stating that he would implement this practice.

Rep. Rafael Anchia (D) – When a bill has been passed in one chamber, it must go to the other chamber. That chamber can make changes to the bills, then the two chambers must confer and agree on changes. This conferring process is achieved through a conference committee made up of members from both chambers. Rep. Anchia’s amendment would have prohibited conference committees from meeting unofficially, or off the record, required a meeting notice to be published 24 hours in advance of the meeting, and the committee must publish the minutes from the meeting. His amendment failed on a vote of 106-35.

Yeas — Allen; Alonzo; Anderson, C.; Anderson, R.; Are ́valo; Ashby;

Bailes; Bell; Bernal; Biedermann; Bohac; Bonnen, D.; Bonnen, G.; Burkett;

Burns; Burrows; Button; Capriglione; Clardy; Cook; Cosper; Craddick; Cyrier;

Dale; Darby; Davis, S.; Davis, Y.; Dean; Deshotel; Dutton; Elkins; Faircloth;

Farrar; Flynn; Frank; Frullo; Geren; Giddings; Goldman; Gonzales; Gooden;

Guillen; Hefner; Herrero; Hinojosa; Holland; Howard; Huberty; Hunter; Isaac;

Israel; Kacal; Keough; King, K.; King, P.; King, T.; Koop; Lambert; Landgraf;

Lang; Larson; Laubenberg; Lozano; Metcalf; Meyer; Miller; Morrison; Murphy;

Murr; Oliveira; Oliverson; Paddie; Parker; Paul; Perez; Phelan; Phillips; Pickett;

Price; Raney; Raymond; Rinaldi; Roberts; Rose; Schofield; Schubert; Shaheen;

Sheffield; Shine; Simmons; Smithee; Springer; Stephenson; Stickland; Stucky;

Swanson; Thierry; Thompson, E.; Thompson, S.; Tinderholt; VanDeaver;

Villalba; Workman; Wray; Zedler; Zerwas.

Nays — Alvarado; Anchia; Blanco; Canales; Collier; Cortez; Dukes; Fallon;

Gervin-Hawkins; Gonza ́lez; Gutierrez; Hernandez; Johnson, E.; Krause; Leach;

Longoria; Lucio; Minjarez; Moody; Mun ̃oz; Neave; Neva ́rez; Ortega; Reynolds;

Rodriguez, E.; Rodriguez, J.; Romero; Sanford; Schaefer; Turner; Uresti; Walle;

White; Wilson; Wu.

 The two amendments that were adopted by the House are as follows:

Rep. Matt Schaefer (R) – Required any meeting of the Appropriations committee to be recorded and placed online, along with the minutes from the meeting. His amendment was passed.

Rep. Jonathan Stickland (R) – This amendment requires all committees post any and all documents related to committee business online. Previously, none of this information would have been available to the public. His amendment was passed.

Read more:  http://www.lonestarvoiceonline.net/single-post/2017/01/28/Transparency-or-lack-there-of

A picture is worth a thousand words

The mind games the Democrats use are so unproductive.

The following is from Senator Ted Cruz:

 
A picture is worth a thousand words.

Which for the Democrats meant boycotting today’s Finance Committee votes for President Trump’s nominees to Treasury & HHS.

The obstruction of Chuck Schumer and Senate Democrats is now reaching unprecedented depths, one of my colleagues even stated this embarrassing display was “the most pathetic he’s seen in his whole time in the United States Senate”.

We can’t let them get away with it, but I need your help to fight back.

After his first week in office eight years ago President Obama had eleven Cabinet Secretaries confirmed, while at the same period of time President Trump received approval for only two nominees.

Democrats don’t have the votes to reject any nominee, but their delay games will severely impact the administration’s ability to implement policy. It’s a disgrace.

Anyone watching closely knows that Senate Democrats who boycotted today’s planned vote are only following the orders of their leftist financial backers, that is why we need to corral the power of the grassroots to take them on and call their bluff.
For Liberty,

Ted Cruz

 

Repeal Obamacare now. No excuses.

By Heritage Foundation

The Heritage Foundation
Jan. 4, 2017
There’s been a lot of talk about change leading up to this week. Guess what? It’s go time. Republicans campaigned on repealing Obamacare and they won. It’s time to make good on that promise. Unsurprisingly, Democrats are already trying to slam the breaks on the president-elect’s Cabinet picks. But are they just being sore losers? History says yes. Plus, why President Obama’s sanctions on Russia are too little, too late. Conservatives have much to look forward to, but only if we get started in the right direction. Consider this your map.
—Michelle Cordero, Managing Editor, Heritage.org
Repeal Obamacare now. No excuses.
President-elect Donald Trump has committed to repealing and replacing Obamacare. But here’s the catch: In order to do this, Trump needs Congress to write legislation for him to sign. Congress can and should do this in January, before Inauguration Day. There is no excuse not to. Thousands of Americans have lost their insurance plans or their doctors. They’ve seen their premiums hiked up to unbelievable levels. Seventeen of the original 23 Obamacare insurance co-ops have collapsed. And, of course, there has always been the rotten, unconstitutional core of Obamacare: the federal government forcing citizens to buy a product. Congress has voted over 60 times to repeal all or part of it. They just need to do it one more time. Read Heritage President Jim DeMint’s op-ed and our report on a how to prepare a smooth transition for the repeal of Obamacare.
Attempts to block nominees won’t work.
If recent history is any guide, the Senate typically gives deference to a new president’s Cabinet picks. Such was the case for Bill Clinton, George W. Bush, and even Barack Obama, who had 10 of his nominees confirmed within his first week as president. However, Senate Democrats are vowing to delay or reject at least eight Trump picks for major Cabinet appointments. At the top of their list is Trump’s choice for attorney general, Sen. Jeff Sessions. Sessions’ confirmation hearing is scheduled for Jan. 10, just 10 days before Trump is sworn in as president. Heritage’s Rachel Bovard says conservatives should feel confident about the confirmation process since Democrats can do little to ultimately derail nominees (due to lack of votes). But they can still use various procedural maneuvers to delay the process. Among them: failing to show up to a committee meeting so that a quorum is not present, and on the Senate floor, prolonging debate for up to 30 additional hours.
Russia sanctions are too little, too late.
Last week, in response to evidence that Russia hacked Democratic Party officials during the presidential election, the Obama administration imposed sanctions on the Russian intelligence community and expelled 35 Russian diplomats from the United States. While these actions are welcome, they are too little, too late, says Luke Coffey, director of Heritage’s Allison Center for Foreign and National Security Policy. As our 2017 Index of U.S. Military Strength states, Russia seeks to maximize its strategic position in the world at the expense of the United States. Russia also maintains incredibly advanced cyberwarfare capabilities and the overall threat is aggressive and formidable. Any future efforts to investigate the extent of Russia’s actions by Congress and the White House must be independent, bipartisan, and thorough. Read more about the threat from Russia and our report on a comprehensive strategy to Russia.by Heritage Foundation